Menu

Benefits Studies

Share on:

Fungicides

The Value and Benefits of Fungicides in U.S. Crop Production is the second in a series of pesticide benefit studies conducted by CPRI staff and funded by CropLife America and its member companies to quantify and communicate the underlying reasons for and benefits of agricultural pesticide use. The study examines fungal and bacterial diseases infecting 50 crops grown in the United States. Through a crop-based case study approach, the study discusses production practices and disease pressure, estimates fungicide use and potential losses to plant diseases, and quantifies the impact of chemical disease control on crop production and farm income.

Spore Wars is the companion presentation to The Value of Fungicides in U.S. Crop Production and can be viewed on our Video Archives page.


Herbicides

Herbicide Benefits Study 2005

The Crop Protection Research Institute updated its 2001 herbicide benefits study in 2006 with release of The Value of Herbicides in U.S. Crop Production: 2005 Update. The 2005 update utilizes the same methodology of the 2001 study to calculate the value of agricultural herbicides by examining the costs associated with their use, the additional costs of alternative weed control methods, and production losses suffered when herbicides are not used.

In 2005, herbicides increased the value of U.S. agricultural productivity by $26 billion. This value is realized through reductions in fuel consumption and manual labor that would be needed to replace the weed control currently achieved with herbicides. Herbicides also benefit the environment by mitigating 356 billion pounds of soil erosion by facilitating no-till crop production.

Herbicide Benefits Study 2001

While working for the National Center for Food and Agriculture Policy, CPRI staff completed The Value of Herbicides in U.S. Crop Production in April of 2003 with a grant from CropLife America. This study defined the value and benefits of herbicides to U.S. crop production in 2001 through forty case studies examining yield, grower expense, and soil erosion impacts of herbicide use.

The agricultural use of herbicides in 2001 resulted in an annual production increase of 289 billion lbs. of food and fiber, grower input expense reduction and increased crop production value of $21 billion, and mitigation of 304 billion lbs. of soil erosion.


Insecticides

The Value of Insecticides in U.S. Crop Production is the third in a series of pesticide benefit studies conducted by CPRI staff and funded by CropLife America and its member companies to quantify and communicate the underlying reasons for and benefits of agricultural pesticide use. The study examines plant  feeding insects infesting 50 crops grown in the United States. Through a crop-based case study approach, the study discusses production practices and insect pressure, estimates use and potential losses to insects, and quantifies the impact of chemical insect control on crop production and farm income.


Seed Treatments

Farmers are most successful when they grow crops that resist disease, do not damage the environment and provide food to a growing population. Seed treatments are the direct application of crop protection products to the surface of a seed prior to planting. This method, helps protect high-quality seeds such as those which have been enhanced through agricultural technologies resulting in added value to growers. Better protected crops mean more benefits for farmers and for their customers. In 2013, CPRI released a new report, “The Role of Seed Treatment in Modern U.S. Crop Production”, which is an in-depth look at the role of modern seed treatments in producing healthier more uniform crops. The report covers abroad array of seed treatment solutions that result in increasing crop value, while reducing potential environmental exposure through precise application methods.


Fumigants

Fumigants are necessary to prepare many planting sites for the healthy growth of trees, vegetables, crops and ornamental plants. According to a study by Markets and Markets, changing farming practices and the need to reduce post-harvest losses are some of the factors motivating farmers to experiment with fumigant use.  Further, rigorous pest free certification standards make it necessessary for some farmers to utilize fumigants in order to meet the requirements for movement of the plants or harvested crop to other regions. CPRI has released a number of reports on the widespread use of fumigants along with natural methods to enhance the quality of plants and crops. These reports highlight the various fumigants that different stakeholders are using based on the region and kinds of crops grown.